Sports complexes including athletics, swiming, cycling, gymnastics, tennis, basketball, hockey and other large enclosures.

These structures will often involve tensioned membrane roof panels, large span trusses, arches, cablenets or other forms of lightweight structures.

The following articles are in random order:

The following table of Largest Stadiums was found on: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_stadiums_by_capacity 

A source of information about Stadiums can be found at http://www.stadiumdb.com

Current Stadiums

A link to view details (non-engineering) of the stadiums for the 2010 World Cup in South Africa:

http://www.smh.com.au/world-cup-2010/stadiums

Stadium profiles

Credits: The following article is adapted from
http://www.mediaclubsouthafrica.com/index.php?
option=com_content&view=article&id=
93:World+Cup+stadiums&catid=39:2010_bg&Itemid=59 

The 2010 Fifa World Cup will be played out in 10 newly built or upgraded stadiums, in nine South African cities.

Five are existing stadiums, all of which have been upgraded, with the showpiece Soccer City in Johannesburg having undergone a major upgrade. The remaining five have been built from scratch - and completed on schedule.

The stadiums are:

Soccer City Stadium, Johannesburg
Ellis Park Stadium, Johannesburg
Cape Town Stadium, Cape Town
Loftus Versfeld Stadium, Pretoria
Durban Stadium, Durban
Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Port Elizabeth
Royal Bafokeng Stadium, Rustenburg
Free State Stadium, Bloemfontein
Mbombela Stadium, Nelspruit
Peter Mokaba Stadium, Polokwane

Demolition and groundwork began in 2006, with construction of all the major facilities starting in February 2007. South Africa’s construction industry, which has substantial experience in large-scale infrastructure development, was consulted about the stadium timelines - and it was agreed that the dates were realistic.